What most people don’t know about World Animal Protection

Should the world be free from cruelty and suffering? Many people would probably answer yes to that question. 

Is the world free from cruelty and suffering? Some humans might say yes but if you ask any animal living on planet earth, they would probably answer with a big fat NO!

Animals are the ones suffering the most, as well as being the ones without a voice to speak up against this injustice. That’s why the world needs organizations like World Animal Protection

In today’s episode of Great.com Talks With… our podcast host Spirit asked Lise-Lott Alsenius at World Animal Protection Sweden to help clarify the work they do for animals.

At WAPS, they move the world to protect animals and work for a world where animals live free from cruelty and suffering, through a sustainable and scientific approach. They also help animals by showing and educating the public about the link between animal and human well-being. They fight with courage, determination, passion and truthfulness to give animals the life they deserve. 

By raising awareness and urgency about animal welfare, they want to create a genuine and lasting impact, and educate people through dialogue and cooperation.

Read the full interview below, and find out more about what World Animal Protection have been up to in their fight to save animals.

Image was taken by: Diana Karner


How would you explain World Animal Protection to someone that is not familiar with your cause and the challenges you are facing?

We move the world to protect animals. Work for a world where animals live free from cruelty and suffering. We have a sustainable and scientific approach. Also, we help animals by showing and educating the public about the link between animal and human well-being. We fight with courage, determination, passion and truthfulness to give animals the life they deserve. 

Is there anything you think most people don’t know about your cause that you would like everyone to understand? 

We want to raise awareness and urgency about animal welfare through dialogue, cooperation, and education. Another issue that I cannot stress enough is how big of an impact the meat industry has on environmental and animal welfare. 72 % of all poultry, 61 % of all eggs and 55 % of all pigs are industrially raised indoors. 

World Animal Protection has received several grants from Open Philanthropy of large sums of money. That means Open Philanthropy thinks you are a highly effective cause. How does World Animal Protection use those grants and why is it so effective to fund an organization like yours? 

We want to create a genuine and lasting impact. We also weigh in how a maximum number of animals can benefit and how much each individual is suffering.

What success at World Animal Protection are you personally proudest of so far? 

A while back I had the pleasure to visit the Romanian organization AMP, the founder of the first bear sanctuary in Europe. This organization has done tremendous work, changing the view on bears from pest to respected wildlife. Additionally, they have done a great job helping stray dogs in the city of Brasov. I was so surprised by the absence of stray dogs walking the streets during my visit. They have successfully increase respect for animals in a country where animal welfare is very, very distant.

If something great would happen in the next year for World Animal Protection, what would that be?  

That EU bans all cages for farm animals.

If someone wants to support your cause, what can they do to help? 

I would encourage people to visit our web page World Animal Protection to find out more about our work and how they can help us move the world for animals. You can sign petitions, donate, become a volunteer or be a goodwill ambassador.  

Want to support their cause? Find out more. 

Want to get involved with World Animal Protection? Of course you do